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Parashat CHUKAT
A key to unlocking the mysteries of life's cycle and renewal

Parashat Chukat, which we read this Shabbat, is unique in offering great hope.

It tells us how we can rid ourselves of the impurity of death, a person who comes into contact with a corpse. And when we say that it is possible to rectify this, meaning that we can purify ourselves from the impurity of death, it gives us a hint that death is temporary and that there will be a world without death in the future.

Indeed, some things seem very strange. They take a cow. The cow is the largest domestic animal in human proximity in ancient times. This cow carries much more life within it than a bull. A bull will never be pregnant, but a cow is destined to carry more life within it.

It must be that same cow with a red color. Red is the color of life.

And they also take a cedar tree. Cedar is a towering tree in the Middle East.

Along with that, they also take hyssop. Hyssop is the tiniest tree in the Middle East. And they also add and take unique red worms [Kermes (dye)].

The worm is the tiniest creature in the world and is also red.

And they burn everything together.

All life, everyone. Even the life found in plants and animal life all turns into ashes. This ash symbolizes absolute death.

And we put this ash into living water. Living water is like the soul. It is an uninterrupted flow of vitality!

And when we combine what symbolizes death with this living flow, we see the possibility of believing in the resurrection of the dead.

Here we encounter the profound optimism of the Jewish people who believe in the resurrection of the dead.

And so we have also witnessed in recent generations how the Jewish people rose from the ashes and revived Israeli nationhood.

A message of Rabbi Oury Cherki - the head of the Noahide World Center 

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In Parshat Hukat symboliseert het ritueel van de rode koe (para aduma) de zuivering van de onzuiverheid van de dood, die geworteld is in de zonde van de Boom der Kennis. Het ritueel bestaat uit het mengen van as met levend water, dat het lichaam en de ziel voorstelt en het herstel van het leven door wederopstanding illustreert. Dit proces onderstreept, ondanks de symbolische helderheid, een Goddelijk mysterie - de overgang tussen leven en dood gaat het menselijk begrip te boven. De Midrasj benadrukt het geheim van de rode koe en benadrukt de diepe en ondoorgrondelijke aard van wederopstanding en de Goddelijke Wil.

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