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Does God need to do miracles every 40 years?!

Does God have to perform miracles every 40 years?!
Why hasn't he done miracles since the Exodus era?

These questions we often get, especially from people who seek the truth.
And there are two answers to that.

The first answer in length we can find in the words of Rabbi Moshe ben Nachman (the Ramban)
who lived about 950 years ago, detailed at the bottom of this post.
We learned it in a detailed lesson.

The second answer is much more poignant and painful.
If we take the Exodus as an example,
The whole world heard about the great miracles that happened there
And yet, except for Jethro, Moses' father-in-law
No one changed their faith or behavior!

Miracles don't change people!

So let's ask ourselves.
To leave one country after 430 years [Exodos 12:40]
We call that: Redemption.
What do we call a situation as the Hebrew Nation survived for 2000 years in Exile - Gathering from all countries of the world, more than 200 countries, and rebuilding their country, the State of Israel [!]

Isn't this with the help of God? Isn't it a miracle?!

And everyone hears and knows
Still, there are many explanations and excuses
Why not change your everyday life,
Why not believe that this is the hand of God in History?

But whoever reads these words is indeed similar to Jethro
who understood and responded and connected to the Creator of the world through the people of Israel

Here, you, too, can take this practical step

Blessings to you and all of your family
From Jerusalem, the city of God

 

"And because the Holy One, blessed be He, will not make signs and wonders in every generation for the eyes of some wicked man or heretic, He commanded us..." [Rabbi Moshe ben Nachman (the Ramban)]

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A Bridge between Faiths
An Open Letter to Islam
[Part 1]

Rabbi Oury Cherki's "A Bridge between Faiths: An Open Letter to Islam, Part 1" delves into the intricate dynamics between Judaism and Islam post the 2023 Hamas attack on Israel. The piece probes the philosophical and legal facets of Islam's status in Jewish literature, uncovering points of unity and contention. Cherki scrutinizes Islam's potential for spiritual progress and calls for a nuanced understanding amid the unique historical context. The article accentuates the scarcity of literature exploring Judaism's stance on Islam, presenting itself as a contribution to fostering mutual comprehension.

Cherki elucidates the shared beliefs in monotheism, rejecting God's corporeality and idolatry, while acknowledging differences in their understanding. Notably, he highlights the significance of the Seven Noahide Laws, urging Islam to embrace them more unequivocally for enhanced cooperation. Judaism's recognition of Islam as a sister religion and the potential for collaboration are explored alongside historical perspectives, celebrating the initial affinity between the two faiths.

However, the article confronts substantial disagreements, including Islam's assertion of the nullification of the Mosaic Torah and claims of corruption by Jews. It underscores the necessity for Islam to acknowledge the eternal validity of the Torah and the divine promise of the Jewish return to their homeland. Cherki posits three prerequisites for Judaism to accept Islam as a legitimate religion for all, calling for recognition, abandonment of claims of corruption, and acknowledgment of the divine promise.

Concluding with a call for peace, Rabbi Oury Cherki sets the stage for Part 2, promising an exploration of Muhammad's status, Judaism's potential contributions to Islamic faith, and more. This open letter seeks to build a bridge between the believers in the One God, urging Islamic religious leadership to engage in dialogue on critical issues for future harmony.

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