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How to choose your Rabbi? And more

After the 'Unlimited - More than 7' post
We got this question

Here is our answer:

Hi and greetings from Jerusalem
The place where God prophets.
Your email contains great few questions; thanks for sending me.
1. keeping Shabbat for Noahide.
Twice God demands us to observe the Shabbat. Every time there is a difference in the exact command:
A. In exodus 20 (verses 8 - 11), God asks us to remember Shabbat (in a positive way).
The reason is: "For [in] six days the Lord made the heaven and the earth, the sea and all that is in them, and He rested on the seventh day. Therefore, the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and sanctified it."
i.e.
It's related to all humankind.
B. In Deuteronomy 5 (verses 12 - 15), God asks us to keep the Shabbat (in a passive way - not to do some actions).
The reason is different from Exodus: "And you shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt and that the Lord your God took you out from there with a strong hand and with an outstretched arm; therefore, the Lord, your God, commanded you to observe the Sabbath day."
i.e.
It's related to the Hebrews nationally only, who were redeemed from Egypt.
 
This brings an exciting debate between the Hebrew sages and how to read Maimonides.
We hold that Noahide has permission to keep full Shabbat. On the other side, we do not recommend this behavior at all. Think about someone who lives in a place without any Hebrew people. Would he be able to keep Shabbat properly? Not!
What yes? Light candles on Friday night to remember that God created our world in six days, and here he stopped. Do a nice meal with your family without electronic devices, and learn from the Hebrew Bible. Those things mention remembering Shabbat as a holy day.
2. What Rabbi to follow?
This is a huge question, and it's not the right thing to 'jump' to the Rabbi who is more convenient for a specific question.
A. First, it's essential to understand the 'Oral Bible' passing through history in the Hebrew Rabbis.
More about this issue you can find on this course. [You can find here the part of 'Oral Bible' for free]
B. Ask the Ribbis who is/was his Rabbi. [You can find out about our Rabbis at this link]
C. I'm offering you to learn our Brit Shalom book, which got recommendations from the Israeli Chief Rabbis and, more critically, Rabbis from the Orthodox community. Here is the link for the book
D. Join our live study every Sunday at 14:00 Israel time at this link
 
With all my blessings
Have a wonderful weekend
Chaim

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A Bridge between Faiths
An Open Letter to Islam
[Part 1]

Rabbi Oury Cherki's "A Bridge between Faiths: An Open Letter to Islam, Part 1" delves into the intricate dynamics between Judaism and Islam post the 2023 Hamas attack on Israel. The piece probes the philosophical and legal facets of Islam's status in Jewish literature, uncovering points of unity and contention. Cherki scrutinizes Islam's potential for spiritual progress and calls for a nuanced understanding amid the unique historical context. The article accentuates the scarcity of literature exploring Judaism's stance on Islam, presenting itself as a contribution to fostering mutual comprehension.

Cherki elucidates the shared beliefs in monotheism, rejecting God's corporeality and idolatry, while acknowledging differences in their understanding. Notably, he highlights the significance of the Seven Noahide Laws, urging Islam to embrace them more unequivocally for enhanced cooperation. Judaism's recognition of Islam as a sister religion and the potential for collaboration are explored alongside historical perspectives, celebrating the initial affinity between the two faiths.

However, the article confronts substantial disagreements, including Islam's assertion of the nullification of the Mosaic Torah and claims of corruption by Jews. It underscores the necessity for Islam to acknowledge the eternal validity of the Torah and the divine promise of the Jewish return to their homeland. Cherki posits three prerequisites for Judaism to accept Islam as a legitimate religion for all, calling for recognition, abandonment of claims of corruption, and acknowledgment of the divine promise.

Concluding with a call for peace, Rabbi Oury Cherki sets the stage for Part 2, promising an exploration of Muhammad's status, Judaism's potential contributions to Islamic faith, and more. This open letter seeks to build a bridge between the believers in the One God, urging Islamic religious leadership to engage in dialogue on critical issues for future harmony.

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