Liquid error (sections/custom_mobile-menu line 86): Expected handle to be a String but got LinkListDrop
  • Group 27 Login

Parashat CHUKAT
A key to unlocking the mysteries of life's cycle and renewal

Parashat Chukat, which we read this Shabbat, is unique in offering great hope.

It tells us how we can rid ourselves of the impurity of death, a person who comes into contact with a corpse. And when we say that it is possible to rectify this, meaning that we can purify ourselves from the impurity of death, it gives us a hint that death is temporary and that there will be a world without death in the future.

Indeed, some things seem very strange. They take a cow. The cow is the largest domestic animal in human proximity in ancient times. This cow carries much more life within it than a bull. A bull will never be pregnant, but a cow is destined to carry more life within it.

It must be that same cow with a red color. Red is the color of life.

And they also take a cedar tree. Cedar is a towering tree in the Middle East.

Along with that, they also take hyssop. Hyssop is the tiniest tree in the Middle East. And they also add and take unique red worms [Kermes (dye)].

The worm is the tiniest creature in the world and is also red.

And they burn everything together.

All life, everyone. Even the life found in plants and animal life all turns into ashes. This ash symbolizes absolute death.

And we put this ash into living water. Living water is like the soul. It is an uninterrupted flow of vitality!

And when we combine what symbolizes death with this living flow, we see the possibility of believing in the resurrection of the dead.

Here we encounter the profound optimism of the Jewish people who believe in the resurrection of the dead.

And so we have also witnessed in recent generations how the Jewish people rose from the ashes and revived Israeli nationhood.

A message of Rabbi Oury Cherki - the head of the Noahide World Center 

مزید ہفتہ وار حصے

Maternal Bonds and Envy
Psychological Effects in Jewish Tradition [Tazria]

Delving into Parshat Tazria, this study delves into Torah laws surrounding impurity and sin offerings post-childbirth in Judaism, contrasting Christian perspectives. It examines the psychological impacts of childbirth rituals, including mother-child envy, and the significance of atonement vows for mothers. Understanding the complexities of childbirth in Jewish tradition offers insights into both religious practices and psychological effects on individuals.

Beyond Creation
The Eighth Day and the Meeting Yet to Come [Shmini]

This article explores the interpretation of Torah, with a focus on the Tabernacle, Nadab, and Abihu's incident, and the Oral Torah studied in the House of Study. It sheds light on the intriguing disagreement between Moses and Aaron, highlighting the distinctions between the Torah of Moses, which stresses perfection, and the Torah of Aaron, which provides atonement.

Harmony in Devotion
Balancing Voluntary and Obligatory Acts in Judaism [Tzav]

Investigate the nuanced differences between Vayikra and Tzav Torah portions, analyzing the dynamic of voluntary Nedavah offerings versus commanded sacrifices in Judaism. Examine the intricate balance between maintaining pure intentions in performing Mitzvot, reflecting on the unique aspects of Olah and Shelamim sacrifices. Discover the deeper significance of the offering order in the Torah, elucidating the interplay between voluntary and obligatory actions in Jewish tradition.

Search