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Seeking Tranquility
The Messianic Aspiration of Jacob

"Jacob dwelt in the land of his father's sojournings, in the land of Canaan." [Genesis 37:1]

What does it mean "dwelt"?

Our sages say: "Our Patriach Jacob because he sought to live in tranquility in this world...". The desire to sit in peace is the essence of the messianic aspiration. The entire messianic expectation is that a day will come when, ultimately, we can 'sit down,' as it is said at the end of the Torah [Duteremony 33:28]: "And Israel dwelled safely and alone as Jacob [blessed them]..."

But as we see, that time has not yet come. Our sages teach us: "Because Our Patriach Jacob sought to live in tranquility in this world, he was confronted by the accuser regarding Joseph." 

I.E., The Holy One, blessed be He, said, What does he want? Does he already want to be in the World to Come? It is not the time. Let him suffer distress due to Joseph's sale. 

What does Joseph want? 

Joseph is a dreamer (Vision) and comes with a dream to his family. He says, "We were binding sheaves in the midst of the field, and behold, my sheaf arose and stood upright, and behold, your sheaves encircled [it] and prostrated themselves to my sheaf."[Genesis 37:7] 

As we know, Jacob's family was engaged in shepherding, so why do they need so much wheat? Joseph may understand that to fix the world, we must go through the economic route. He wants to provide grain to the globe, which Joseph does later in Egypt.

In addition, he has another dream. He sees his brothers as stars, eleven stars bowing down to him, indicating that the place Joseph wants to influence is in exile. He wants to be like stars, illuminating humanity's night within the night of humanity. But his brothers oppose this, saying it's time to establish the center of holiness in the land of Israel and not attempt another exile.

But the Holy One, blessed be He, always allows trying, even if this attempt ultimately ends in the subjugation of Egypt. The idea that one should try ideological ideals that stem from good intentions is said: "Let us  see what will become of his dreams." [Genesis 37:20] We must give it a chance! 

Indeed, divine providence arranges for Joseph to go down to Egypt to sustain all of humanity and illuminate Abraham's house's spirituality within the great culture of Egypt.

It's done to fulfill Joseph's request. And all drimers along History.

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