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Parashat MATOT & MASEY
Harnessing the Sacred Force of Speech

Parshiyot Matots and Masai reveal new dimensions of the Torah that we would not have thought of—the affair of the vows.

Vows are unique because they show a person can renew a commandment [Mitzvot] that he was not obligated to. 

After all, the moment a person vows that he commits to a particular behavior or he commits to bring a sacrifice, or he commits to refrain from a specific behavior, at that moment, his words will become part of the words of the Torah.

The same goes for oath laws. Suppose a person vows not to eat bananas. So he must not eat bananas. But the Torah did not forbid eating bananas. 

Indeed, but the Torah requires a person to keep his word. 

And here, we see two unique tracks for treating the person's speech:

  1. There are what we call 'Canceling vows.'
  2. And there are 'Breaking vows.' 

The 'Canceling vows' is when a person makes a vow and then sees that he cannot fulfill his commitment. So he should go to the sages and say - here it is true that I was absent like this, and this is how I ask that you find a way for me to get out of this. 

Then they find what is called an opening for him. 

They tell him maybe you didn't think about such and such a situation. You didn't think about how this would hurt your friends and parents, and then if he says I didn't think - the sages say it's good, so since it wasn't included in your intention, we cancel it - it's allowed vows.

There is also the possibility of 'Breaking vows,' which happens within the family. For example, a woman swears, and this causes a breakdown in the peace of the home. So the Torah gave special authority to her husband to break the vow to keep peace and harmony in this home.

We see how seriously the Torah takes a person's speech. 

So much so that when he has an obligation that is difficult for him to fulfill, then he has to turn to some other authority, not only to himself, to be able to violate his words.

How great and holy a person's speech is, how significant it is according to the Torah that a person can create a special holiness of special mitzvot Just by the power of his speech. 

The Path to Spiritual Intimacy: Nurturing Your Relationship with GoD - With The Power of your words!

 

פרשות נוספות

To be a partner and participate in the act of bringing Messiah into the world [Bha'alotkha]

The article discusses the Second Pesah in Parshat B'haalotkha, emphasizing its importance for spiritual renewal and national identity. It examines the need for Pesah sacrifice and purification, especially after idolatrous acts, and contrasts this with Christian theology's lack of a national component. Highlighting the month of Iyar, it shows how redemption during this period stems from the initiative of the Israelites from below. The significance of dates like Independence Day and Jerusalem Day in Iyar is linked to this grassroots awakening, portraying a unique phase in Israel's redemption as partners with the Creator

Integrating Personal and Communal Well-Being through Torah
[Nasso]

Parshat Nasso addresses individual and family issues while emphasizing the collective unity through the Priestly Blessing. This blessing, structured in three levels, reflects a balance between material and spiritual needs: "May HaShem bless you and watch over you." for wealth, "May HaShem cause His countenance to shine to you" for spiritual illumination through Torah, and "May HaShem lift up His countenance upon you and grant you peace" for the deep connection of Nefesh, Ruah, and Neshama. The Torah guides to integrate personal and communal well-being harmoniously.

Beyond the Count: Individual Worth and Collective Unity
[Bemidbar]

Parshat Bamidbar discusses the commandment to count the Israelites, focusing on those eligible for the army. This count underscores the tension between collective and individual identities. The Torah uses the expression "number of names," signifying the importance of both the collective and the individual. The Torah teaches that true unity blends these aspects, with the collective gaining meaning through each individual's uniqueness. This concept is reflected in the principle of "generalization and specification" in scriptural interpretation, with hidden meanings in the numbers, explored through the gematria.

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