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Parashat Ekev
Feeding the Soul: A Heartfelt Journey of Blessings After Every Meal

Introduction:

One of the most significant mitzvot in Parsha Ekev relates to the fact that the People of Israel are about to enter the Land of Israel. The Torah promises a fertile land of fruits - wheat and barley, vines, figs, and pomegranates. It is said, "You shall eat, be satisfied, and then bless Adonai, your God." Although this commandment seems tied to the entry of the people of Israel into the Land, the blessing holds universal significance. Let's explore the roots of this mitzvah and its profound meaning.

The Foundation of Faith:

Abraham, our patriarch, did not offer metaphysical or philosophical proofs of God's existence. Instead, he created a situation where his guests must, existentially, recognize that their existence is derived from the outside. This truth becomes evident when we eat – acknowledging that we are receivers and understanding that our existence did not begin with us. Recognizing ourselves as creations naturally leads to understanding the presence of a Creator, forming the very foundation of Judaism.

The Essential Blessing:

Among the many prayers in our faith, only the blessing after a meal is deemed obligatory by the Torah. Its significance extends beyond the revelation at Sinai, focusing on the notion that Hashem is the Provider for the entire world. As a benevolent force to all, the mitzvah of reciting a blessing for our food becomes incumbent upon all nations, embracing the image of God within each creature. Even those living by the Noahide Faith share this sacred obligation, as illustrated in the Brit Olam prayer book.

Embracing Universality:

Birkat HaMazon, the blessing after a meal, transcends faith and borders, encompassing a universal message of gratitude and receptivity. Reflecting on the wisdom of Abraham and the recognition of a Creator, this ancient tradition unites us in the understanding of divine provision. Through Birkat HaMazon, we reaffirm our interconnectedness with existence itself, bridging the gap between nations and celebrating the oneness of all humanity.

Conclusion:

As we partake in Birkat HaMazon, the universal blessing after a meal, let us embrace its spiritual essence. Beyond religious boundaries, this sacred tradition speaks to our shared humanity, reminding us to be grateful for the divine provision in our lives. Like Abraham, let us acknowledge our existence as receivers and celebrate the unity that unites us all.

With Blessing GOD [Birkat HaMazon], we find a prayer of thanks and a profound expression of universal connectedness.

Scripture:

One of the most significant mitzvot in Parsha Ekev relates to the fact that the People of Israel are about to enter the Land of Israel. The Torah promises to be a fertile land full of fruits- wheat and barley, vines, figs, pomegranates, etc. And about
all these are said: "You shall eat, be satisfied and then bless Adonai, your God."
Although this commandment was said in the context of the entry of the people of Israel into the Land, the blessing is universal. In the stories from the Midrash, we learn that when Abraham would receive guests in his tent, people of any nation, he would provide them with food and then ask them to say thank you for the food. In response, they would begin to thank Abraham and his wife, Sarah. Interrupting, Abraham would stop them and suggest they thank the One who created the world and everything contained within. This is the basis of the mitzvah of reciting a blessing over our
food to express our Faith in the Creator.
Let us note that Abraham, our patriarch, did not offer meta-physical or philosophical proofs of God's existence. Instead, he created a situation where his guest must recognize that his existence is derived from the outside. This is what happens when a person eats. When we eat, we accept that we need to be "receivers." It means that a person recognizes that they were created and that their existence did not begin with them. Subsequently, one who acknowledges they are a "creation "as is made understands that there is a Creator. This is the foundation of Judaism.
In our entire Faith, of all the many prayers we recite, only the blessing after a meal is deemed obligatory by the Torah. The message insinuated here is more about food than the Torah's revelation at Sinai. The essential news here is that Hashem is the Provider for the entire world. He is kind to all; therefore, the mitzvah of reciting a blessing for our food is incumbent upon all nations. This obligation applies to every creature formed in the" image of God" (B'tselem). A person living according to the Noahide Faith should also recite the blessing after a meal (Birkat HaMazon), as explained in the Brit Olam prayer book. In the book, we have included a version of the "Blessing Following A Meal" appropriate for members of all nations.

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